Store Blog

FW19 Editorial Looks

With the cold weather setting in, and seemingly here to stay, we put together a few winter-inspired looks that we think really represent the tones and textures of the season.

Alpine Adventurer

Battenwear - Bouldering Pants - Caramel Duck Canvas
Battenwear - Five Pocket Canyon Shirt - Blanket Flannel Beige Plaid
Battenwear - Northfield Parka - Green
Battenwear - Watch Cap Beanie - Orange
Fracap - M120 Magnifico Leather Boots - Black with Fur Lining

 Weekend Wanderer

Kestin Hare - Field Overshirt Jacket - Charcoal Wool
Kestin Hare - Haymarket Fleece Pocket Sweatshirt - Navy
Kestin Hare - Inverness Water Repellent Trouser - Olive
VEJA - Rio Branco Hexamesh - Gravel/Marsala
Battenwear - Field Cap - Brushed Maroon

Office Optimum

18 Waits - The Classic Trench - Midnight Navy Wool
Outclass - Mockneck Merino Sweater - Charcoal Grey
Bon Vivant - Keenan Heavyweight Slim Chino - Navy
Portuguese Flannel - Twill Micro Plaid Flannel Shirt - Blue/Brown
Astorflex - Bitflex Suede Chelsea Boot - Dark Khaki

Cozy Charm

Country of Origin - Tri-Colour Lambswool Sweater - Dark Navy/Red/Green
Portuguese Flannel - Relaxed Tapered Corduroy Trousers - Black
New Balance -  M997HCX - Covert Green

Layering Guide

Don't get us wrong, we love a great fitting tee. But we get all giddy when it comes to the L-word (layers!!). With Fall wasting no time in sending the sun packing, staying warm is quickly becoming priority number one. Piling on a bunch of sweaters isn't exactly the smartest (nor stylish) solution. The good news is we’ve broken down some essential layering piece you need to have at your disposal this season. 

When it comes to layering, a light-to-medium gauge cardigan or zip-up (ideally in a temperature-regulating fabric such as Merino wool) is a versatile choice. Merino’s an active fibre – it reacts to changes in body temperature, keeping you warm on crisp autumnal days, and cool if the weather is unseasonably warm.

 

Few jackets can be worn in quite as many ways as the Chore jacket. Usually unlined and in a hard-wearing fabric such as cotton drill or moleskin, it’s ideal for a range of casual looks from all-out workwear through to off-duty tailoring. It can also be layered under a heavier garment, or over something lighter such as knitwear or a vest. Due to its boxy cut it can easily accommodate a chunky roll neck underneath, or an equally functional utility vest if you want to maximize the pockets available to you.

 

The overshirt can be treated in a similar way to the chore jacket in that it can worn in a hundred different ways. Open over a T-shirt, buttoned up under an overcoat, or even worn over a lighter shirt, it’s the utility player capable of doing it all. However, the overshirt needs to have a slightly boxy, almost oversized cut, which will allow it to be worn over another shirt and should be made from a heavier weight fabric than the shirt worn underneath to differentiate the two.

Warm, elegant and a lot easier than messing around with buttoned cuffs, a nice knitted sweater makes a sophisticated and hassle-free alternative to a shirt, and looks its least ‘math teacher’ when paired with an overcoat.

To tie the look together, consider going tonal up top with a navy blue knit under navy outerwear, or set off a camel coat with a rust or burnt orange design.

Just as overcoats can be dressed up, they can also easily be dressed down. Chuck an overcoat into the mix over a hoodie and things get considerably more exciting. 

Collection Review - Kestin Hare FW19 - In High Places

Kestin Hare’s Autumn/Winter 19 collection titled “In High Places” draws inspiration from the British mountaineers in the 1970s. This era was described as “the golden age of mountaineering” with a key group of die-hard British climbers achieving celebrity status due to their pioneering and inspiring efforts.

Research started with a trip to uncover the archives at the Scottish Mountain Heritage Museum near Fort William. There the team uncovered garments that were worn by the climbers, including the renowned crowd of Dougal Haston, Robin Smith, Doug Scott, Don Williams and Chris Bonnington. Inspiration was taken from the fabrics, functionality, details, colours and production of the garments.

The A/W19 colour palette reflects the natural environment of the mountain terrain in the 1970s and is made up of icy blues, off whites, moss greens and highlights of pollen yellow. Ventile, British wool, Italian boiled wool, textured fleeces and multiple checks are tied into the collection, reflecting the cloth of vintage mountaineering pieces.

Corduroy Is So Hot Right Now!

There are two kinds of men who wear cords. There’s your dad, or your granddad, with too-big trousers puddling on their shoes. Then there’s the likes of Ryan Gosling or Wes Anderson – men who embrace depth in their wardrobes, as in their art. Corduroy is one of the most underutilized materials in men’s style and, if worn correctly, can make for an indispensable piece of clothing.

 

Cord is a textile composed of woven, twisted cotton or wool, resulting in parallel lines (called ‘wales’). Wool corduroy is the most durable type and wears particularly well. So cord trousers will withstand a fair bit of rough and tumble. The Indiana Jones of legwear, if you will. They can get a bit warm, though, so it’s best to save them for when the cold starts to bite.

Contrary to its sometimes stuffy connotations, corduroy is brilliant when dressed down and worn casually. Try teaming a pair of dark corduroy trousers with a sweatshirt and practical leather sneakers. The beauty of cords is that you can go as jazzy or discreet as you like, but they’re never boring.

Cord Shirt: A corduroy shirt can be just the piece to add some texture to your wardrobe. Styling your new shirt is a walk in the park too, thankfully. Team a cord shirt with dark denim and boots for Western-inspired styling or (use it to) update your 9-5 wardrobe; they pair nicely with tailored trousers and smart brogues.

Cord Waistcoat/Vest: A corduroy waistcoat should channel the suaveness of James Bond rather than the geekiness of a geography teacher. Adopt a vintage aesthetic but make it slightly modern. For colour think browns  or blues and then finish your look with knitwear layered beneath your waistcoat in a tonal variation of your waistcoat's shade.

Cord Pants: When it comes to styling, treat corduroy  trousers as if they were patterned: best worn with quieter wardrobe staples to keep things calm. And don’t think that corduroy trousers must be brown. There are a plethora of colour options out there which are all easy to wear.

Cord Jacket: Thanks to a wealth of modern cuts and colourways, a corduroy jacket has zero geek vibes when you get it right. It’s not all about looks though, a cord jacket is actually good at keeping you warm (who’d have thought?) so your mom will love it too. Versatility is another of the corduroy jacket’s strong suits. A knit’s always a winner. Pair with a crew or turtleneck underneath, then go for a less textured pair of trousers or jeans to complement the jacket. Finish with a pair of leather boots or runners for a more casual look.

The Bomber Jacket

Originally created for military pilots, the Bomber jacket, also known as the Flight jacket and very close cousin to the Varsity jacket, has gone on to become a bona-fide menswear classic and a modern-day must-own for any style-conscious gent. Comfortable, cool and effortless, the outerwear silhouette has been adopted by casual wear lovers for generations, still holding its own as a fashion staple to this very day. From high-end to high street, the bomber continues to be revived and reinvented season upon season, with little sign of stopping. For this Fall/Winter season, we have four equally sharp yet cosmetically different choices to cover all the bases.

Outclass - Bomber Jacket - Olive & Black

 

When that colder weather sets in, a bomber jacket may not be the most obvious choice to layer over formalwear, but it can look just as sharp as a blazer during the summer. If you want the smart bomber look, team your jacket with a crisp white shirt, slim-cut chinos and a pair of loafers/monk-straps for a dress-down look. Don't be afraid to pair a Bomber with a tie as well. The zipper or buttons should blend in and pockets remain empty of anything other than your hands. Stick to minimal collar and cuffs that echo the jacket’s body. But above all else, never do it all the way up. You need to spot the shirt and tie below to tilt your look towards the formal.

Dangerfield - Cashmere/Wool Varsity Bomber Jacket - Black



Born out of the American school system, the varsity jacket has gone on to cement its rightful place within the wardrobes of men worldwide. Traditionally, this silhouette features a wool torso, button fastening, ribbed cuffs and waistband, contrast leather sleeves and a boxy fit – yet the modern industry definition isn’t so rigid. Sidestep all preppy and Ivy League connotations by combining your modern varsity jacket with simple casual staples – think slim-cut chinos, selvedge denim, sneakers and neutral T-shirts.

STILL BY HAND - Wool Zip-Up Rib Blouson Jacket - Charcoal

One of the jacket’s many strengths is undoubtedly the breadth of versions designers can offer, and therefore are available at many price points. Men looking for an alternative to a blazer have quickly realized that a simple bomber shape in suede looks grown-up, expensive and goes with pretty much everything else in their wardrobe. Put simply, the bomber is season-less, ageless and adaptable to all manner of fabrics. If you aren't sure how to style it, when in doubt, go minimal. 

3sixteen - Stadium Jacket - Black