Store Blog

Collection Review - KESTIN FW21 - Colourcraft

Bernat Klein’s rich and varied work continues to supply Kestin Hare with endless inspiration. The Kestin FW21 collection is titled Colourcraft (named after Klein’s original Ltd company). Living and working in the Scottish Borders from 1951 until 2014, the infamous Serbian designer Klein was a visionary colourist – he treated colour as being a language and something that could express human emotions in different ways to words.
The very beginning of Kestin's design process has always been colour; the colour palette sets the tone and informs all fabric choices and then filters down into the design of the garments. Kestin takes inspiration from Scotland’s natural landscapes, buildings and artists, and weave them into their collections, connecting them to their home. 

 “Klein's work and approach to life continues to inspire me and my team. Like me, he used the natural landscapes from Scotland as a key inspiration for colour. He saw the benefits in being liberal with expressing yourself, both in terms of design and colour and medium. That idea of never restricting yourself appeals to me, constantly learning and pushing to create newness." Creative Director, Kestin Hare.

AW21 references colours from Klein’s abstract paintings, textiles and the iconic Peter Womersley architecture and interiors of Klein’s studio and home High Sunderland. Natural tones of peat, sand and forest green reference the natural surroundings, are spliced with architectural-inspired stone, camel and charcoal, and spliced with bright pops of survival orange, cobalt blue and ochre. 

Crieff Wool Fleece Windbreaker - Winter White

 

Corduroy Is So Hot Right Now!

There are two kinds of men who wear cords. There’s your dad, or your granddad, with too-big trousers puddling on their shoes. Then there’s the likes of Ryan Gosling or Wes Anderson – men who embrace depth in their wardrobes, as in their art. Corduroy is one of the most underutilized materials in men’s style and, if worn correctly, can make for an indispensable piece of clothing.

 

Cord is a textile composed of woven, twisted cotton or wool, resulting in parallel lines (called ‘wales’). Wool corduroy is the most durable type and wears particularly well. So cord trousers will withstand a fair bit of rough and tumble. The Indiana Jones of legwear, if you will. They can get a bit warm, though, so it’s best to save them for when the cold starts to bite.

Contrary to its sometimes stuffy connotations, corduroy is brilliant when dressed down and worn casually. Try teaming a pair of dark corduroy trousers with a sweatshirt and practical leather sneakers. The beauty of cords is that you can go as jazzy or discreet as you like, but they’re never boring.

Cord Shirt: A corduroy shirt can be just the piece to add some texture to your wardrobe. Styling your new shirt is a walk in the park too, thankfully. Team a cord shirt with dark denim and boots for Western-inspired styling or (use it to) update your 9-5 wardrobe; they pair nicely with tailored trousers and smart brogues.

Cord Waistcoat/Vest: A corduroy waistcoat should channel the suaveness of James Bond rather than the geekiness of a geography teacher. Adopt a vintage aesthetic but make it slightly modern. For colour think browns  or blues and then finish your look with knitwear layered beneath your waistcoat in a tonal variation of your waistcoat's shade.

Cord Pants: When it comes to styling, treat corduroy  trousers as if they were patterned: best worn with quieter wardrobe staples to keep things calm. And don’t think that corduroy trousers must be brown. There are a plethora of colour options out there which are all easy to wear.

Cord Jacket: Thanks to a wealth of modern cuts and colourways, a corduroy jacket has zero geek vibes when you get it right. It’s not all about looks though, a cord jacket is actually good at keeping you warm (who’d have thought?) so your mom will love it too. Versatility is another of the corduroy jacket’s strong suits. A knit’s always a winner. Pair with a crew or turtleneck underneath, then go for a less textured pair of trousers or jeans to complement the jacket. Finish with a pair of leather boots or runners for a more casual look.

How To Wear Summer Hues

Warmer weather means one of two things for your wardrobe: 1) it’s time to switch to clothes that make you feel cooler; and 2) it’s time to start passing on the black and navy in favour of brighter shades. If tried-and-true hues like black, grey and navy are ‘safe’, then bolder ones like yellow and pink are, in sartorial terms, asking for trouble. However, we all know how relatively easy it is to pull off neutral looks made up of black, white, navy and grey, but if you really want to stand out from the pack, it’s time to start embracing bolder hues.

 PINK

Still hung up on pink supposedly being for girls? Then consider this: it’s no myth that until the end of the 19th century pink was – in the Western world – actually thought of as a masculine hue. Whether dusty and soft or bold and bright, pink has been big news for several seasons now. And the shade is not about to fade away anytime soon. It pairs well with plenty of colours you probably already have in your wardrobe – including brown, beige, blue, white and darker shades of green, such as olive. Guys with a darker complexion can wear most shades of pink, but those with fairer skin should opt for deeper variants to sidestep the washout effect.

YELLOW

Yellow is a statement colour that needs to be used sparingly and anchored with neutrals. With this in mind, always look to control use of the hue with surrounding pieces in white, blue, grey, beige and charcoal. Perhaps more importantly, though, is finding a shade that doesn’t wash you out – especially if you’re of a fairer skin tone. While darker skin types will be able to pull off everything from corn flour to canary yellow, fairer men need to be slightly more cautious. For those with lighter skin tones, you may need some sun before you start wearing yellow.

GREEN

No matter what shade you opt for, this masculine colour always looks best paired with blue, white and grey, while darker military variants complement similarly earthy hues such as brown and mustard. The only real consideration to be made is skin tone. Those with pale/fair skin should stick to deeper shades like bottle green, while anyone with an olive/medium complexion just needs to avoid shades too close to the skin, such as olive. Finally, guys with darker complexions have the pick of the lot, along with the added benefit of being able to wear bold, bright hues like jade green.