Store Blog

Layering Guide

Don't get us wrong, we love a great fitting tee. But we get all giddy when it comes to the L-word (layers!!). With Fall wasting no time in sending the sun packing, staying warm is quickly becoming priority number one. Piling on a bunch of sweaters isn't exactly the smartest (nor stylish) solution. The good news is we’ve broken down some essential layering piece you need to have at your disposal this season. 

When it comes to layering, a light-to-medium gauge cardigan or zip-up (ideally in a temperature-regulating fabric such as Merino wool) is a versatile choice. Merino’s an active fibre – it reacts to changes in body temperature, keeping you warm on crisp autumnal days, and cool if the weather is unseasonably warm.

 

Few jackets can be worn in quite as many ways as the Chore jacket. Usually unlined and in a hard-wearing fabric such as cotton drill or moleskin, it’s ideal for a range of casual looks from all-out workwear through to off-duty tailoring. It can also be layered under a heavier garment, or over something lighter such as knitwear or a vest. Due to its boxy cut it can easily accommodate a chunky roll neck underneath, or an equally functional utility vest if you want to maximize the pockets available to you.

 

The overshirt can be treated in a similar way to the chore jacket in that it can worn in a hundred different ways. Open over a T-shirt, buttoned up under an overcoat, or even worn over a lighter shirt, it’s the utility player capable of doing it all. However, the overshirt needs to have a slightly boxy, almost oversized cut, which will allow it to be worn over another shirt and should be made from a heavier weight fabric than the shirt worn underneath to differentiate the two.

Warm, elegant and a lot easier than messing around with buttoned cuffs, a nice knitted sweater makes a sophisticated and hassle-free alternative to a shirt, and looks its least ‘math teacher’ when paired with an overcoat.

To tie the look together, consider going tonal up top with a navy blue knit under navy outerwear, or set off a camel coat with a rust or burnt orange design.

Just as overcoats can be dressed up, they can also easily be dressed down. Chuck an overcoat into the mix over a hoodie and things get considerably more exciting.