Store Blog

FW19 Editorial Looks

With the cold weather setting in, and seemingly here to stay, we put together a few winter-inspired looks that we think really represent the tones and textures of the season.

Alpine Adventurer

Battenwear - Bouldering Pants - Caramel Duck Canvas
Battenwear - Five Pocket Canyon Shirt - Blanket Flannel Beige Plaid
Battenwear - Northfield Parka - Green
Battenwear - Watch Cap Beanie - Orange
Fracap - M120 Magnifico Leather Boots - Black with Fur Lining

 Weekend Wanderer

Kestin Hare - Field Overshirt Jacket - Charcoal Wool
Kestin Hare - Haymarket Fleece Pocket Sweatshirt - Navy
Kestin Hare - Inverness Water Repellent Trouser - Olive
VEJA - Rio Branco Hexamesh - Gravel/Marsala
Battenwear - Field Cap - Brushed Maroon

Office Optimum

18 Waits - The Classic Trench - Midnight Navy Wool
Outclass - Mockneck Merino Sweater - Charcoal Grey
Bon Vivant - Keenan Heavyweight Slim Chino - Navy
Portuguese Flannel - Twill Micro Plaid Flannel Shirt - Blue/Brown
Astorflex - Bitflex Suede Chelsea Boot - Dark Khaki

Cozy Charm

Country of Origin - Tri-Colour Lambswool Sweater - Dark Navy/Red/Green
Portuguese Flannel - Relaxed Tapered Corduroy Trousers - Black
New Balance -  M997HCX - Covert Green

Layering Guide

Don't get us wrong, we love a great fitting tee. But we get all giddy when it comes to the L-word (layers!!). With Fall wasting no time in sending the sun packing, staying warm is quickly becoming priority number one. Piling on a bunch of sweaters isn't exactly the smartest (nor stylish) solution. The good news is we’ve broken down some essential layering piece you need to have at your disposal this season. 

When it comes to layering, a light-to-medium gauge cardigan or zip-up (ideally in a temperature-regulating fabric such as Merino wool) is a versatile choice. Merino’s an active fibre – it reacts to changes in body temperature, keeping you warm on crisp autumnal days, and cool if the weather is unseasonably warm.

 

Few jackets can be worn in quite as many ways as the Chore jacket. Usually unlined and in a hard-wearing fabric such as cotton drill or moleskin, it’s ideal for a range of casual looks from all-out workwear through to off-duty tailoring. It can also be layered under a heavier garment, or over something lighter such as knitwear or a vest. Due to its boxy cut it can easily accommodate a chunky roll neck underneath, or an equally functional utility vest if you want to maximize the pockets available to you.

 

The overshirt can be treated in a similar way to the chore jacket in that it can worn in a hundred different ways. Open over a T-shirt, buttoned up under an overcoat, or even worn over a lighter shirt, it’s the utility player capable of doing it all. However, the overshirt needs to have a slightly boxy, almost oversized cut, which will allow it to be worn over another shirt and should be made from a heavier weight fabric than the shirt worn underneath to differentiate the two.

Warm, elegant and a lot easier than messing around with buttoned cuffs, a nice knitted sweater makes a sophisticated and hassle-free alternative to a shirt, and looks its least ‘math teacher’ when paired with an overcoat.

To tie the look together, consider going tonal up top with a navy blue knit under navy outerwear, or set off a camel coat with a rust or burnt orange design.

Just as overcoats can be dressed up, they can also easily be dressed down. Chuck an overcoat into the mix over a hoodie and things get considerably more exciting. 

How To Wear Summer Hues

Warmer weather means one of two things for your wardrobe: 1) it’s time to switch to clothes that make you feel cooler; and 2) it’s time to start passing on the black and navy in favour of brighter shades. If tried-and-true hues like black, grey and navy are ‘safe’, then bolder ones like yellow and pink are, in sartorial terms, asking for trouble. However, we all know how relatively easy it is to pull off neutral looks made up of black, white, navy and grey, but if you really want to stand out from the pack, it’s time to start embracing bolder hues.

 PINK

Still hung up on pink supposedly being for girls? Then consider this: it’s no myth that until the end of the 19th century pink was – in the Western world – actually thought of as a masculine hue. Whether dusty and soft or bold and bright, pink has been big news for several seasons now. And the shade is not about to fade away anytime soon. It pairs well with plenty of colours you probably already have in your wardrobe – including brown, beige, blue, white and darker shades of green, such as olive. Guys with a darker complexion can wear most shades of pink, but those with fairer skin should opt for deeper variants to sidestep the washout effect.

YELLOW

Yellow is a statement colour that needs to be used sparingly and anchored with neutrals. With this in mind, always look to control use of the hue with surrounding pieces in white, blue, grey, beige and charcoal. Perhaps more importantly, though, is finding a shade that doesn’t wash you out – especially if you’re of a fairer skin tone. While darker skin types will be able to pull off everything from corn flour to canary yellow, fairer men need to be slightly more cautious. For those with lighter skin tones, you may need some sun before you start wearing yellow.

GREEN

No matter what shade you opt for, this masculine colour always looks best paired with blue, white and grey, while darker military variants complement similarly earthy hues such as brown and mustard. The only real consideration to be made is skin tone. Those with pale/fair skin should stick to deeper shades like bottle green, while anyone with an olive/medium complexion just needs to avoid shades too close to the skin, such as olive. Finally, guys with darker complexions have the pick of the lot, along with the added benefit of being able to wear bold, bright hues like jade green.

 

White In Summer

When it comes to style, sometimes less really is more. As much as bright colours and vivid prints have their place in every man’s warm-weather wardrobe, the power of taking a minimal approach should not be underestimated. Much of the popularity of wearing white is down to its clean, fresh and contemporary feel. Sometimes – while everyone else is busy making statements with eye-catching hues and clashing patterns – all it takes is a neutral ensemble to set a man apart from his peers.

 

Of course wearing white does have a potential to be a catastrophe. To keep your white attire stain-free and looking its best, it may sound obvious, but it’s best to avoid certain foods and drinks when sporting white-on-white. If you do have a marinara-related mishap, the worst thing you can do is let the stain dry. Wet the affected area and, as soon as you can, plunge the stained garment into warm water with a scoop of stain removing agent. Leave it to soak for six hours, cross your fingers, and then wash the garment as you normally would. Wash whites separately.  

 

If you're opting to go for white-on-white, the key to crafting a stylish single colour look is to create clear separation between each piece. The easiest way to do this is by mixing up your shades. There is no rule that states you must stick to pure white here – hues such as off-white, cream, ivory, eggshell and light beige complement white perfectly and will help create that subtle definition we desire. Similarly, you can differentiate through texture.

 

If you're keeping your look sharp, key pieces you should be looking to invest in are pieces that can be combined with everything you have in your wardrobe, making them a solid addition to your separates collection. You can pair a linen shirt under a blazer, or a lightweight short-sleeve shirt under a think sweater. 

 

If you're keeping your look more casual, keep it simple with a relaxed yet structured t-shirt. A white t-shirt paired with light jeans and white sneakers is an easy look to pull off. Or pair a colourful tee with a pair of white shorts to for the perfect wear-weather look.

The Cuban (Havana-Collar) Shirt

Not much else adds a summer vibe to your style more than a Cuban collar shirt. Relaxed, breathable and usually in a great seasonal print, this season the Cuban shirt is seriously on-trend.

Portuguese Flannel - Ananas S/S Shirt

The Cuban shirt (sometimes known as the Vacation, Havana, revere or camp collar) is an old-school staple and has made a made a major comeback in recent seasons. Though Cuban collar shirts found their niche in the 1900s, the origin of this particular shirt style dates as far back as the 18th century in South America, where they served as a sort of uniform for working-class men. It is unclear how exactly this shirt style sailed over to North American soil (tourism probably played a role prior to the 60s), but Cuban collars took men’s fashion by storm in the 50s — quickly becoming one of the wardrobe staples of the decade.

3sixteen - Vacation Shirt - Olive

 

The classic Cuban collar shirt features an open, notch lapel-like collar, short sleeves, and a straight, boxy hem. It has a similar silhouette to retro bowling shirts and touristy Hawaiian shirts but with a bit more class (the two are not synonymous). The modern variant features a more fitted cut in the body and tapered sleeves. And this season, we have a host of rather more flattering ways to wear it. 

Outclass - Barre Stripe Havana Shrit - Taupe

 

There are a lot of ways to wear this piece, but it takes careful styling. Stick to lighter materials to keep that warm-weather outlook as a unifying thread. As well as wearing it solo, either tucked in to tailored trousers or over chinos, try slotting it under an unstructured blazer for a louche summer wedding outfit. Just never wear a tie with it!

Portuguese Flannel - Purple Haze

If heading to Havana – or at least anywhere the temperature gets above 20 degrees Celsius – pair yours with a pair of cotton shorts and/or suede loafers. If you’re more into the rebellious youth culture of the 1950s, opt to pair it with skinny jeans and cuff the shirt sleeves instead.

Kestin Hare - Crammond Shirt - Mustard/Natural